How to Say Purple in Different Languages

Purple in Different Languages: Purple is a color that comes between red and blue. It is identical to violet, but unlike violet, which is a visible light spectrum, purple is a secondary color made of red and blue combinations. It became the color of Romans ‘ kings. The color is historically associated with the modesty and nobility in Japan.

How to Say Purple in 88 Different Languages

Different LanguagesWord Purple
Albanianvjollcë
Basquemorea
Belarusianфіялетавы
Bosnianpurple
Bulgarianлилаво
Catalanporpra
Croatianpurpurna boja
Czechnachový
Danishlilla
DutchPurper
Estonianpurpurne
Finnishvioletti
Frenchviolet
Galicianroxo
Germanlila
Greekμωβ (mov)
Hungarianlila
IcelandicFjólublátt
Irishcorcra
Italianviola
Latvianviolets
Lithuanianvioletinė
Macedonianвиолетова
Maltesevjola
Norwegianlilla
Polishfioletowy
Portugueseroxa
RomanianViolet
Russianпурпурный (purpurnyy)
Serbianљубичаста (ljubichasta)
SlovakFialová
Slovenianvijolična
Spanishpúrpura
Swedishlila
Ukrainianфіолетовий (fioletovyy)
Welshporffor
Yiddishלילאַ
Armenianկարմրել
Azerbaijanitünd qırmızı
Bengaliরক্তবর্ণ
Chinese Simplified紫色 (zǐsè)
Chinese Traditional紫色 (zǐsè)
Georgianpurple
Gujaratiજાંબલી
Hindiबैंगनी
Hmongntshav
Japanese紫の
Kannadaನೇರಳೆ
Kazakhкүлгін
Khmerស្វាយ
Korean자 (ja)
Laoສີມ່ວງ
Malayalamപർപ്പിൾ
Marathiजांभळा
MongolianНил ягаан өнгийн
Myanmar (Burmese)ခရမ်းရောင်နု
Nepaliबैजनी
Sinhalaපාට, දම් පාට
Tajikарғувон
Tamilஊதா
Teluguఊదా
Thaiสีม่วง
Turkishmor
Urduجامنی رنگ
Uzbeksiyohrang
Vietnamesemàu tím
Arabicأرجواني ('arijwani)
Hebrewסָגוֹל
Persianرنگ بنفش
Afrikaanspers
Chichewachibakuwa
Hausashunayya
Igboodo odo
Sesothopherese
Somaliiyo guduud
Swahilizambarau
Yorubaeleyi ti
Zulupurple
Cebuanopurpura
Filipinolila
Indonesianungu
Javanesekain
Malagasyvolomparasy
Malayungu
Maoripapura
Esperantopurpura
Haitian Creolekoulè wouj violèt
Latinpurpura

The lack of Purple in existence and the expense of making the shade has for centuries lent purple a supernatural aura. Purple is also the best rainbow pigment–and it has grown overtime in a color with an influential background. In fact, the roots of the purple are more important and interesting than any other color.

Clothing and metallic dyes have also grown like civilizations. The first purple dye dates to about 1900 B.C. About 12000 shellfish were required to obtain 1.5 grams of pure dye–just enough to dye the Roman toga. It is therefore no surprise that this color was primarily used for emperors ‘ clothing or privileged people.

Purple symbolizes wonder, mystery, faith, unconsciousness, imagination, integrity, royalty–and more than any other hue evokes all those senses. Varieties in purple have various meanings: light-hearted purples are delicate and romantic. The darker tone is more dignified and sophisticated. Too much purple has irritability, impatience and arrogance.

Too little purple can cause feelings of helplessness, misery and apathy. As the purple color is created by combining the strong warm with the strong cool color, both warm and cool characteristics are retained. The color purple can encourage creativity and imagination, while too much purple will inhibit creativity and cause moodiness.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *