How to Say Time in Different Languages

Time in Different Languages: Time is the relentless movement of existence and things in the almost infinite series from the past, the current, into the future. Time is a portion of the quantity of different measurements used for measuring events, evaluating incident time or periods and quantifying the number of shifts in the quantity in material reality or in conscious experience.

How to Say Time in 88 Different Languages

Different LanguagesWord Time
Albaniankohë
Basquedenbora
Belarusianчас
Bosnianvrijeme
Bulgarianпът
Catalantemps
Croatianvrijeme
Czechčas
Danishtid
Dutchtijd
Estonianaeg
Finnishaika
Frenchtemps
Galiciantempo
GermanZeit
Greekχρόνος (chrónos)
Hungarianidő
IcelandicTími
Irisham
Italiantempo
Latvianlaiks
Lithuanianlaikas
Macedonianвреме
Malteseħin
Norwegiantid
Polishczas
PortugueseTempo
Romaniantimp
Russianвремя (vremya)
Serbianвреме (vreme)
Slovakčas
Sloveniančas
Spanishhora
Swedishtid
Ukrainianчас (chas)
Welshamser
Yiddishצייַט
Armenianժամանակ
Azerbaijanivaxt
Bengaliসময়
Chinese Simplified时间 (shíjiān)
Chinese Traditional時間 (shíjiān)
Georgianდრო
Gujaratiસમય
Hindiपहर
Hmonglub sij hawm
Japanese時間
Kannadaಸಮಯ
Kazakhуақыт
Khmerពេល
Korean시각 (sigag)
Laoທີ່ໃຊ້ເວລາ
Malayalamകാലം
Marathiवेळ
Mongolianцаг хугацаа
Myanmar (Burmese)အချိန်
Nepaliसमय
Sinhalaකාලය
Tajikзамони
Tamilநேரம்
Teluguసమయం
Thaiเวลา
Turkishzaman
Urduوقت
Uzbekvaqt
Vietnamesethời gian
Arabicزمن (zaman)
Hebrewזְמַן
Persianزمان
Afrikaanstyd
Chichewanthawi
Hausalokaci
Igbooge
Sesothonako
Somaliwaqtiga
Swahiliwakati
Yorubaakoko
Zuluisikhathi
Cebuanopanahon
Filipinooras
Indonesianwaktu
Javanesewektu
Malagasyfotoana
Malaymasa
Maori
Esperantotempo
Haitian Creoletan
Latintempus

Time was a major subject for religious philosophical and scientific studies for many years, but it was always ignored by the researchers to describe it in a way that would be applicable to all fields without circularity. Nevertheless, different areas, such as business, manufacturing, athletics, science and the performing arts include a certain concept of time.

Although process philosophers believe that the future is open or indescribable somewhat, while the past is unchangeable and fixed, and determined, multi-faceted philosophers hold that talking about changes to the future as much as talking about changing the past is foolish. Human emotions strongly influence the theory of time.

Individuals are not only depressed about the past but also fear the future, not least because the perceived tide of time appears to be dragging them toward destruction like swimmers get washed into a waterfall.

The irreversible and inexorable passage of time is caused by the fact of mortality on human beings. Unlike the others they know, their lives can at any time be cut short, and their growth will be followed by eventual decay and, in due course, death, even if they reach the full expectation of human life. The assumption that one’s life on earth is consistently a result of the repetitiveness of the natural phenomenon that has been witnessed.

The day-to-night process and the periodic seasonal cycle have governed the conduct of human life, until the modern use of inanimate physical forces in the Industrial Revolution has allowed the research to be done for the whole year 24 hours a day— by artificial light, and under power.

In the three domains of religious life, of history (both natural and cosmic), and of personal life, the time principle was retained cyclically. It is most evident in the context of faith that this perspective originated from the experiences of recurrence in the environment In the ancestor culture the perception of the generation process was reflected.

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