How to Say Zero in Different Languages

Zero in Different Languages: 0 (zero) is a number, and the numerical digit used to speak to that number in numerals. It satisfies a focal job in arithmetic as the added substance personality of the whole numbers, genuine numbers, and numerous other mathematical structures. As a digit, 0 is utilized as a placeholder set up esteem frameworks.

How to Say Zero in 88 Different Languages

Different LanguagesWord Zero
Albanianzero
Basquezero
Belarusianнуль
Bosniannula
Bulgarianнула
Catalanzero
Croatiannula
Czechnula
Danishnul
Dutchnul
Estoniannull
Finnishnolla
Frenchzéro
Galiciancero
GermanNull
Greekμηδέν (midén)
Hungariannulla
IcelandicNúll
Irishnialas
Italianzero
Latviannulle
Lithuaniannulis
Macedonianнула
Malteseżero
Norwegiannull
Polishzero
Portuguesezero
Romanianzero
Russianнуль (nul')
Serbianнула (nula)
Slovaknula
Sloveniannič
Spanishcero
Swedishnoll-
Ukrainianнуль (nul')
Welshsero
Yiddishנול
Armenianզրո
Azerbaijanisıfır
Bengaliশূন্য
Chinese Simplified零 (líng)
Chinese Traditional零 (líng)
Georgianნული
Gujaratiશૂન્ય
Hindiशून्य
Hmongzero
Japaneseゼロ
Kannadaಶೂನ್ಯ
Kazakhнөл
Khmerសូន្យ
Korean제로 (jelo)
Laoສູນ
Malayalamപൂജ്യം
Marathiशून्य
Mongolianтэг
Myanmar (Burmese)သုည
Nepaliशून्य
Sinhalaශුන්ය
Tajikнол
Tamilபூஜ்யம்
Teluguసున్నా
Thaiศูนย์
Turkishsıfır
Urduصفر
Uzbeknol
VietnameseKhông
Arabicصفر (sifr)
Hebrewאֶפֶס
Persianصفر
Afrikaansnul
Chichewaziro
Hausasifili
Igboefu
Sesotholefela
Somalieber
Swahilisufuri
Yorubaodo
Zuluzero
Cebuanozero
Filipinosero
Indonesiannol
Javanesenul
Malagasyaotra
Malaysifar
Maorikore
Esperantonulo
Haitian Creolezewo
Latinnulla

Names for the number 0 in English incorporate zero, naught (UK), naught (US), nil, or—in settings where at any rate one neighboring digit recognizes it from the letter “O”— goodness or o. Casual or slang terms for zero incorporate nothing and zip.

This brazen yet incredible number has caused more contention and gave more joy than some other digit I know. For a certain something, it enables us to gauge what’s to come.

Be that as it may, it took two centuries for zero, with all its scientific splendor, to be acknowledged as an appropriate number. Furthermore, this occurred in India.

As per math writer Alex Bellos, India was the ideal setting: “The possibility of nothing being something was at that point somewhere down in their way of life. In the event that you consider ‘nirvana’ it’s the condition of nothingness – every one of your stresses and wants to go. So why not have an image in vain?”

That image was called ‘shunya’, a word still utilized today to mean both nothing as an idea, and zero as a number. When zero had increased a toehold in South Asia, it crossed into the Middle East, where it was advocated by Islamic researchers, and made piece of the Arabic number framework that we use today.

Staggeringly it wasn’t until the fifteenth Century that zero, alongside the various Arabic numbers, was at last acknowledged. Just to place it in setting, by then Oxford University in England had been around for a considerable length of time and the print machine was simply ready for action. So how about we raise a glass of impeccably circular air pockets to the most balanced, and generally ground-breaking, number ever.

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