How to Say Dragon in Different Languages

Dragon in Different Languages: A dragon is a huge, mythical serpentine creature which is found throughout the world in the folklore of many cultures. Dragons vary dramatically according to area, but dragons have often been described as winged, horned, four-legged and breathable in the western cultures of the High Middle Ages. Dragons in Eastern cultures are usually portrayed as wingless, four-legged, excessively intelligent, serpentine beings.

How to Say Dragon in 88 Different Languages

Different LanguagesWord Dragon
Albaniandragua
Basquedragoi
Belarusianцмок
Bosnianzmaj
Bulgarianдракон
Catalandrac
Croatianzmaj
Czechdrak
Danishtrække på
Dutchdraak
Estoniandraakon
Finnishlohikäärme
Frenchdragon
Galiciandragón
GermanDrachen
Greekδράκων (drákon)
Hungariansárkány
IcelandicDreki
IrishDragon
ItalianDrago
Latvianpūķis
Lithuaniandrakonas
Macedonianзмеј
MalteseDragun
Norwegiandrage
Polishsmok
PortugueseDragão
Romanianbalaur
RussianДракон (Drakon)
Serbianзмај (zmaj)
Slovakdrak
Slovenianzmaj
Spanishdragón
Swedishdrake
Ukrainianдракон (drakon)
Welshdragon
Yiddishדראַקאָן
Armenianթեվավոր մողես
Azerbaijaniəjdəha
Bengaliঘুড়ি বিশেষ
Chinese Simplified龙 (lóng)
Chinese Traditional龍 (lóng)
Georgiandragon
Gujaratiડ્રેગન
Hindiअजगर
Hmongzaj
Japaneseドラゴン
Kannadaಡ್ರ್ಯಾಗನ್
Kazakhайдаһар
Khmerនាគ
Korean용 (yong)
Laoມັງກອນ
Malayalamഡ്രാഗൺ
Marathiड्रॅगन
Mongolianлуу
Myanmar (Burmese)နဂါး
Nepaliड्रागन
Sinhalaමකරා
Tajikаждаҳор
Tamilடிராகன்
Teluguడ్రాగన్
Thaiมังกร
TurkishEjderha
Urduڈریگن
Uzbekajdar
VietnameseRồng
Arabicتنين (tanin)
Hebrewדְרָקוֹן
Persianاژدها
Afrikaansdraak
Chichewachinjoka
Hausadragon
Igbodragon
Sesothodrakone
Somalimasduulaagii
Swahilijoka
Yorubadragoni
Zuludragon
Cebuanodragon
FilipinoDragon
Indonesiannaga
Javanesedragon
Malagasydragona
Malaynaga
Maoritarakona
Esperantodrako
Haitian Creoledragon
Latindraco

The trust in these living beings seemed to emerge from the ancients of a dragon-like, prehistoric giant reptile without the least knowledge. The term “drakōn” in Greece was originally used for any large serpent (see the sea snake), and the mythological dragon remained essentially a snake, whatever form it later got adopted.

Commonities among dragon features includes snakelike characteristics, reptilian skin, four legs with 3 or 4 toes each, the spinal nodes running down the back, a tail, and a tight jaw with rows of teeth, and are often a hybridization of the avian, feline, reptile features. Some modern scholars think that large crocodiles, extinct and moving, have the nearest likened and most probable analog of the current dragon imagery when they are found in forest or wetland.

The outline of the dragon differed from the beginning. The Chaldean Dragon Tiamat had four arms, a scaly corpse and wings, while the Biblical Dragon of Revelation, the “old dragon,” was like the Greek Hydra with multiple heads. Dragons were used as warlike emblems at an early stage, because they not only had defensive and terrorist attributes, but also had aesthetic effects.

The faith in dragons was founded not only in the legend, but at least in hard evidence, or so long ago. For thousands of years no one understood what to do about the giant bones which have sometimes been found around the globe, and for people who do not know dinosaurs, dragons seemed normal.

Scholars think that dragons’ fire-respiring dimension comes from medieval mouth-representations. Hell’s entrance was often portrayed as a literal mouth of a demon, which was marked by the flames and smoke of Hades. The correlation is very natural if you believe not just in the literal life of hell, but in the actual nature of dragons as Demonic.

Dragons are just humanly portrayed, and they never existed physically.

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