How to Say Power in Different Languages

Power in Different Languages: Power is an individual’s capacity to control others ‘ actions in social and political sciences. The term “authority” is often used for power, which the social structure perceives to be legitimate. This kind of primitive exercise of power is historically endemic to humanity, but the same concept, as social beings, is regarded as good and inherited or given as an aid, move and empower others to achieve their humanistic goals. The interdependencies between two individuals and the world usually arise from these variables.

How to Say Power in 88 Different Languages

Different LanguagesWord Power
Albanianpushtet
Basquepower
Belarusianмагутнасць
Bosnianmoć
Bulgarianмощност
Catalanpoder
Croatianvlast
CzechNapájení
Danishstrøm
Dutchmacht
Estonianvõimsus
Finnishteho
FrenchPuissance
Galicianpoder
GermanLeistung
Greekεξουσία (exousía)
Hungarianerő
IcelandicMáttur
Irishcumhacht
Italianenergia
Latvianjauda
Lithuaniangalia
Macedonianмоќ
Malteseenerġija
Norwegianmakt
Polishmoc
Portuguesepoder
Romanianputere
Russianмощность (moshchnost')
Serbianснага (snaga)
Slovakmoc
Slovenianmoč
Spanishpoder
Swedishkraft
Ukrainianпотужність (potuzhnist')
Welshpŵer
Yiddishקראַפט
Armenianուժ
Azerbaijanigüc
Bengaliক্ষমতা
Chinese Simplified功率 (gōnglǜ)
Chinese Traditional功率 (gōnglǜ)
Georgianძალა
Gujaratiશક્તિ
Hindiशक्ति
Hmonghwj chim
Japaneseパワー
Kannadaವಿದ್ಯುತ್
Kazakhкүш
Khmerអំណាច
Korean힘 (him)
Laoພະລັງງານ
Malayalamശക്തി
Marathiशक्ती
Mongolianэрчим хүч
Myanmar (Burmese)စွမ်းအား
Nepaliशक्ति
Sinhalaබලය
Tajikҳокимият
Tamilசக்தி
Teluguశక్తి
Thaiอำนาจ
Turkishgüç
Urduطاقت
Uzbekelektr
Vietnamesequyền lực
Arabicقوة (qua)
Hebrewכּוֹחַ
Persianقدرت
Afrikaanskrag
Chichewamphamvu
Hausaikon
Igboike
Sesothomatla
Somalixoog
Swahilinguvu
Yorubaagbara
Zuluamandla
Cebuanogahum
Filipinokapangyarihan
Indonesiankekuasaan
Javanesedaya
Malagasyfahefana
Malaykuasa
Maorimana
Esperantopotenco
Haitian Creolepouvwa
Latinimperium

Force and threat of force do not have to be included in power. The “soft power” idea in conjunction with hard power is an illustration of using control without coercion. A big part of the recent sociological discussion about power reflects on the issue of means to make power effective–in other words to do so as much as it can limit and discourage social actions.

The philosopher Michel Foucault viewed power as a structural expression, which requires both restriction and ability, “the complex strategic situation in a given social environment.” The influence or the strength of people to recruit others and to create trust is a reference force. It is focused on the power holder’s charm and interpersonal skills.

A person can be admired due to his personal character and this admiration creates the chance to influence one another. Here the powerful person wants to identify with and be satisfied with these personal qualities. Expert power is the energy of a person deriving from the individual’s talents or qualifications and his or her requirements for these competencies and skills.

In contrast to the others, this type of power is usually very specific and restricted to the specific area in which the expert is taught and schooled. If they are competent and worthy of knowing a problem, offering ideas, making rational decisions and executing them in general, others want to hear them. If people show experience, they seem to have faith and value what they have to say.

For every organization, power is essential. If an individual has control, he has the potential to do something. When managers have no authority, people can easily ignore their orders, but supervisors are more likely to be able to comply with their directives as they can affect a person’s jobs or salary.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *