How to Say Cheers in Different Languages

Cheers in Different Languages: A beautiful night of drinking after the whole week grind of work sounds a great idea. It sounds even better when you are a traveler. Sometimes crazy friendships begin with just a glass of drink.  But remember to use it responsibly because drinking is prohibited in some countries so you must learn an appropriate way to cheers.

How to Say Cheers in 88 Different Languages

Different LanguagesWord Cheers
AlbanianGëzuar
Basquecheers
Belarusianура
BosnianŽivjeli
Bulgarianназдраве
Catalanaplaudiments
CroatianŽivjeli
CzechNa zdraví
DanishSkål
Dutchproost
Estonianterviseks
FinnishKippis
Frenchà votre santé
Galiciansaúde
GermanProst
GreekΣτην υγειά σας (Stin ygeiá sas)
HungarianEgészségére
IcelandicSkál
Irishcheers
ItalianSaluti
Latvianpriekā
LithuanianĮ sveikatą
Macedonianовации
MalteseCheers
Norwegianjubel
PolishTwoje zdrowie
PortugueseFelicidades
Romaniannoroc
Russianура (Ura)
SerbianЖивели (Zhiveli)
Slovakna zdravie
Slovenianna zdravje
Spanishaclamaciones
SwedishSkål
Ukrainianура (ura)
Welshlloniannau
Yiddishלחיים
ArmenianԿենացը
Azerbaijanialqış
Bengaliচিয়ার্স
Chinese Simplified干杯 (gānbēi)
Chinese Traditional乾杯 (gānbēi)
Georgianგაუმარჯოს
Gujaratiટીમે
Hindiचियर्स
Hmongcheers
Japanese乾杯
Kannadaನೆರೆದಿದ್ದ
KazakhУра
Khmerលើកទឹកចិត្ត
Korean건배 (geonbae)
Laocheers
Malayalamചിയേഴ്സ്
Marathiआई
MongolianИНЭЭХ
Myanmar (Burmese)ရွှင်လန်း
Nepaliचियर्स
Sinhalaප්රීති ඝෝෂාවට
TajikБарои Саломати!
Tamilசியர்ஸ்
Teluguచీర్స్
Thaiไชโย
Turkishşerefe
Urduچیرس
Uzbekrahmat
VietnameseChúc mừng
Arabicفي صحتك (fi sihtik)
Hebrewלחיים
Persianبه سلامتی
Afrikaanscheers
Chichewaamasangalatsa
Hausadon faranta zuciya
Igboekele dịrị
SesothoIn
Somalifarxiya
Swahilicheers
Yorubamú inú
Zulucheers
Cebuanocheers
Filipinotagay
Indonesiantepuk tangan
JavaneseCheers
Malagasymahafaly
Malaysorakan
Maoriwhakahari
Esperantogajan
Haitian Creolecheers
Latiniubentium

There are some regional pronunciations according to the area of that country. Besides ‘hello’ and ‘thank you’ cheers is also an important word you need to learn as a traveler, “Meet you at the bar at 8” goes to “cheers” at the bar. Plus you do not know who else can you meet at the bar. Eating together is one of the biggest social activities of which the most interactive is sharing a drink. In The Odyssey by Homer, Odysseus drinks to the health of Achilles.

During the first century B.C., the Roman Senate made it law that people must drink to the health of Emperor Augustus at every meal. The first toast in England allegedly occurred several centuries after that, at a feast in honor of British King Vortigern in 450 A.D. Basically, ever since humans drank the first beers 7,000 years ago, they’ve been thinking of things to drink to. So, the drinking is not new and it has been there for ages. People shared drinks on feasts and night out parties. In some countries drinking is a tradition and people are more habitual of drinking at different events.

A common belief in European countries is that if you don’t make eye contact when clinking glasses, you’ll get seven years of bad luck. Spain has a similar superstition that if you try to toast with water instead of alcohol, you’ll get the same curse.

Cheers:  Cheers to good health before drinking remains customary around the globe. But why do we clink glasses? It was a view that you can prevent yourself from getting intoxicated by clinking the glasses. Fill your glass to the top and while clinking you alcohol may pass to another person’s glass. Saying cheers is a way to stay safe from evil spirits the sounds of glasses clinking would scare demons and spirits away.

Next time you visit a country and share a drink do notice their motions and follow tradition. Say it loud to locals “cheers”.

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