How to Say Prince in Different Languages

Prince in Different Languages: A prince is a male leader or member of monarch’s or former monarch’s family (situated under a king, a great prince and a great duke). Prince is still a (sometimes highest) aristocracy in a variety of European countries, sometimes inherited. A princess is the female counterpart.

How to Say Prince in 88 Different Languages

Different LanguagesWord Prince
Albanianprinc
Basqueprintze
Belarusianпрынц
Bosnianprinc
Bulgarianпринц
Catalanpríncep
Croatianprinc
Czechprinc
Danishprins
Dutchprins
Estonianprints
Finnishprinssi
Frenchprince
GalicianPríncipe
GermanPrinz
Greekπρίγκιπας (prínkipas)
Hungarianherceg
IcelandicPrinsinn
IrishPrionsa
ItalianPrincipe
Latvianprincis
Lithuanianprincas
Macedonianпринц
Malteseprinċep
Norwegianprins
Polishksiążę
PortuguesePrincipe
Romanianprinţ
Russianпринц (prints)
Serbianпринц (princ)
Slovakprinc
Slovenianprinc
SpanishPríncipe
Swedishprins
Ukrainianпринц (prynts)
Welshtywysog
Yiddishפּרינץ
Armenianիշխան
Azerbaijanişahzadə
Bengaliরাজপুত্র
Chinese Simplified王子 (wángzǐ)
Chinese Traditional王子 (wángzǐ)
Georgianprince
Gujaratiરાજકુમાર
Hindiराजकुमार
HmongNone
Japanese王子
Kannadaರಾಜಕುಮಾರ
Kazakhханзада
Khmerព្រះអង្គម្ចាស
Korean왕자 (wangja)
Laoນາ
Malayalamപ്രഭു
Marathiराजा
Mongolianханхүү
Myanmar (Burmese)မင်းသား
Nepaliराजकुमार
Sinhalaකුමරු
Tajikшоҳзода
Tamilஇளவரசன்
Teluguప్రిన్స్
Thaiเจ้าชาย
Turkishprens
Urduپرنس
Uzbekshahzoda
VietnameseHoàng tử
Arabicأمير (amyr)
Hebrewנסיך
Persianشاهزاده
Afrikaansprins
Chichewakalonga
Hausaprince
Igboisi
Sesothokhosana
Somaliamiir
Swahilimkuu
Yorubaolori
Zuluisikhulu
Cebuanoprincipe
Filipinoprinsipe
Indonesianpangeran
Javanesepangeran
Malagasyandriana
Malayputera
Maorirangatira
Esperantoprinco
Haitian Creolechèf
Latinprinceps

The sovereign regnant’s wife is usually named the prince’s consort or merely’ prince,’ while the spouses of the male monarch carry on her substantially specific gender relative title (i.e. queen). In Brazil, Portugal and Spain, be that as it may, the spouse of a female ruler was agreed what could be compared to her title (e.g., head, lord), in any event after he fathered her beneficiary. Spouses of regnant sovereigns have routinely been treated as eligible in past centuries, with a royal title and position among their consorts.

In any case, in societies which permit the ruler to have a few spouses (e.g., four in Islam) or authority mistresses these ladies, some of the time all in all alluded to as an array of mistresses, there are frequently explicit standards deciding their relative chain of command and an assortment of titles, which may recognize those whose posterity can be in line for the progression or not, or explicitly who is mother to the beneficiary to the position of royalty.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *